U. S. National Railroad Workers Contract Negotitations Begins in January 2015

In the context of expanded production in the US economy, increased hiring amongst the major “Class 1” railroads and an industry expansion driven by increased oil production in the United States. Industry-wide contract negotiations have opened between the major US  rail carriers and the trade union organizations that represent the workforce in the rail transportation industry.

As reported in industry periodical Progressive Railroading U.S. Class I workforce widened again in December”  The ranks of working employees in the six class one railroads increased overall by nearly 5 percent including an over 8 percent increase in “T&E” employees–the trainmen and engineers who operate the moving equipment. This hiring activity remains active into 2015.

Below is an aggregation of articles covering still the developing negotiations between the rail carriers and the various employee unions.

NRLC statement

Unions and Craft Employment Figures for 2015 Rail Contract Bargaining round.

The Militant (logo)

Vol. 79/No. 3      February 2, 2015
(front page)
Rail workers discuss fight against
bosses’ attack on safety, crew size

As union contracts expire, freight rail workers in U.S. and Canada face bosses’ demands for speedup, cuts in crew size. Above, July 31 protest in Seattle against one-man crew.

BY ANNE CARROLL
AND R.V. SMALLWOOD

CHICAGO — More than 140,000 workers are in the middle of contract negotiations with the wealthy owners of freight railroads throughout the U.S. and Canada who are driving to increase profits at the expense of safety.

http://railroadworkersunited.org/us-unions-in-national-bargaining/

About rawlinsview

News and political commentary from the point of view of the social interests of the international working class.
This entry was posted in Labor Movement and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s